May 14, 2014

How Football Sounds To People That Don’t Care. This Guy Nails It.

Firstly, imagine every time within a day that football is mentioned by someone else. Secondly, replace it with something that you don’t want to hear about every day. Say… Archaeology. Then, think carefully about how an average day would pan out.

So, you awaken to the clock radio. It’s 7AM. Just as you awaken, it’s time for the news and archaeology already. Not news and other historical investigations, like library restorations or museum openings (unless there’s another event happening), but just the news and archaelogy. Malaysian plane is still missing. Pistorius is still on trial. New dig announced in Giza. Ancient Mayan temple discovered. Exciting stuff.

Time for a bite to eat over the morning TV. More news. More archaeology. Yes, you are aware of what is up with the missing plane. Fine. Now the archaeology in video format. Video of people dusting off some skulls and bits of pottery. All well and good, but archaeology isn’t your thing. It would be nice to hear about something else.

Even when it isn’t archaeology season, the media follow noted archaeologists. They drive fast cars, date beautiful women, advertise fragrances, and sometimes they go to nightclubs and act in the worst possible way. Scandals erupt as the tabloids follow these new celebrities when they’re not searching the past for answers. It is entirely possible you can recite the names of certain researchers, even if you don’t pay attention to archaeology. You don’t know what transfer season is, but you know that someone was transferred to a dig in Peru for a sum of money that could fund the London Underground for two whole days.

Out of the car at 8:55 and into work. What are the colleagues talking about, I wonder? Oh, Jones dropped a 3,890 year old pot and smashed it? What a useless wanker! Someone should do something unpleasant to him. And don’t even ask about the unfortunate incident in Athens two years ago - you’ll be there all day! Breaking a pillar like that! We don’t talk about that here, mate. What? You don’t want to discuss the finer points of the prevalence of phallic imagery in Pompeii? Is there something wrong with you?

The drive home from work. Every thirty minutes, no matter the station, someone mentions the archaeology. Best sit in silence. Drive past a huge billboard with a black and white picture of a rakishly handsome archaeologist draped over an impossibly beautiful woman. He’s winking at you. Trowel in his left hand, supermodel in the right. Jurassic, by Calvin Klein.

And now the pub. A nice pub with a beer garden. Posters in the windows. LIVE EXCAVATION AT THE VALLEY OF THE KINGS! All of it on a huge TV with the volume up too loud. Drunken people yelling at the screen. “SEND IT FOR CARBON DATING, YOU USELESS ***K!” “WHAT ARE YOU ON, MATE? DUST THE ANCIENT MEDALLION GENTLY! SMELTING METHODS OF THE TIME PRODUCED VERY SOFT AND IMPURE METALS EASILY PRONE TO DISFIGURATION!” All this from two men out of a crowd of twenty. One lousy drunken idiot and his chum ruin the image of other archaeology fans. Carbon dating report from the lab updates on TV, read by a man employed because they’ve been following the beautiful science since they were a boy. The drunk chimes in again. “WHAT PHARAOH’S REIGN DID YOU SAY? DO YOU KNOW WHAT THIS SAYS ABOUT THE UNDERPINNINGS OF OUR THEORY OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT OF 4TH BC EGYPT? GET IN, MATE!” A cheer cascades through the building and you can only wonder why.

Best go home and avoid anyone who might be drinking and singing. You once met a disagreeable chap who threatened to beat you up because you didn’t watch the archaeology. “Not a late paleolithic era supporter are you? Think you’re better than me? I’ll have you, you scrawny tw*t!”

To bed. To repeat the cycle tomorrow. The inescapable, inevitability that wherever you go, someone, somewhere, is just dying to talk to you about the archaeology.

Used with permission

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I can totally relate to this. From my point of view this applies to all sports not only football. The world would be so much more fun if people stopped blabbing about sports and talked about interesting stuff instead.

April 5, 2014

kingedwardviii:

royallymonroe:

A letter from Edward, Prince of Wales (Later Edward VIII) to his first mistress, Freda Dudley Ward. 

The two - who’s relationship lasted five years - met during an air raid in London, in 1918.

Buckhouse [Buckingham Palace] S.W. 

12th May 1919.

My darling beloved little Fredie,

Bless you for your two sweet little letters which have made me so so happy. Particularly the last one saying that you are arriving back this evening & suggesting that I shld [should] look in after the opera. Oh! No I couldn’t possibly do such a common thing as that - - - - !!!!

Sweetheart, how can you say “or shall we wait till Tues”? Of course must come & am so so overjoyed at the thought of seeing my own precious darling little girl again so soon. I ought to be able to get round about 12:00 & I’ll let myself in as I’ve still got the key!! It’s so so divine of you wanting your little David to come & you just can’t think how happy you’ve made him, beloved one & how much it makes him love & adore you.

[Writing across the top of the letter]

All all my great love & more [??] than I’m capable of sending my very own darling beloved precious little Fredie. Bless you!!

Your devoted and adoring petit(?) [??], David.

* I can’t make out the words marked with [??], can anyone else see what they are? Feel free to add them if you can.

This may be of particular interest to anyone who saw the Downton Abbey Christmas Special. 

The word marked above with the question marks is “baisers”, it´s french and means kisses.

(Source: TIME, via historicalwhatsits)

9:39pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zp1sgx1CBymfB
  
Filed under: history 
March 31, 2014
gunneratlarge:

Oh, and there was that time we burnt down that house.
No, I wasn’t joking.

WOW - now that is really  a sight, I hope you had some experimental archeologists working with you guys who took the chance to produce comparisons to finds and sifted through the ashes…

gunneratlarge:

Oh, and there was that time we burnt down that house.

No, I wasn’t joking.

WOW - now that is really  a sight, I hope you had some experimental archeologists working with you guys who took the chance to produce comparisons to finds and sifted through the ashes…

March 31, 2014
dailyreenactor:

IMG_0210.jpg on Flickr.

A very nice action shot which does exactly what living history and reenactment is all about - it gives the viewer the feeling to be right in the middle of history. Heads off to the photographer.

dailyreenactor:

IMG_0210.jpg on Flickr.

A very nice action shot which does exactly what living history and reenactment is all about - it gives the viewer the feeling to be right in the middle of history. Heads off to the photographer.

March 31, 2014
ritasv:

Photo by Pahz

pity that the horses equipment it modern, but a nice picture

ritasv:

Photo by Pahz

pity that the horses equipment it modern, but a nice picture

(Source: flickr.com)

March 31, 2014

bantarleton:

The British Legion in action!

March 31, 2014

Top:

Cancer image is folio 5v from the “Shaftesbury Psalter”, catalogued “Lansdowne 383” in the British Library.
http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=8825&CollID=15&NStart=383

Bottom:

Reproduction of it by Carlo Niato, painted on parchment with historic pigments and technique.

March 31, 2014

erikkwakkel:

chasing-yesterdays:

Medieval depictions of Cancer the Crab by artists who had possibly never actually seen a crab:

1) Detail from the floor of a twelve-legged owl-faced crab at Canterbury Catherdral, UK. Eerily reminiscent of the plastic “cootie” contained in the children’s game of the same name.

2) MSS, unsourced by author of original post, depicting a particularly disturbing crab with a human face and a furry tail. And a nosebleed.

3) Stone medallion above door-arch, Cathedrale St-Lazare, Burgundy, showing a crab that resembles an unholy love triangle between a pig, a duck, and a snapping turtle.

I love the approach in this (well-referenced) Tumblr: showing the same object depicted in different artistic media - floor decoration, book illumination and sculpting. It shows you how in the same age, the Middle Ages, artists had different ideas (and knowledge) about the objects they were depicting.


The 2nd image is folio 5v from the “Shaftesbury Psalter”, catalogued “Lansdowne 383” in the British Library.
http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=8825&CollID=15&NStart=383

My boyfriend did a reproduction of it on parchment with historic pigments and technique, but I can´t upload it on this post, I will blog the reproduction in the next post.

(via blueandbluer)

March 27, 2014
ytellioglu:

The Minaret of Jam is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in western Afghanistan. It is located in the Shahrak District, Ghor Province, by the Hari River. The 62-metre high minaret, surrounded by mountains that reach up to 2400m, was built in the 1190s, entirely of baked-bricks. It is famous for its intricate brick, stucco and glazed tile decoration, which consists of alternating bands of kufic and naskhi calligraphy, geometric patterns, and verses from the Qur’an
 The Minaret of Jam is probably located at the site of the Ghurid Dynasty’s summer capital, Firuzkuh (Firuz Koh). During the 12th and 13th century, the Ghurids controlled what is now Afghanistan, but also parts of eastern Iran, Northern India and parts of Pakistan.
The Arabic inscription dating the minaret is unclear - it could read 1193/4 or 1174/5. It could thus commemorate the victory of the Ghurid sultan Ghiyas ud-Din over the Ghaznevids in 1186 in Lahore. However, Ralph Pinder-Wilson, believes the minaret was built for the victory of Mu’izz ad-Din, Ghiyath ud-Din’s brother, over Prithviraj Chauhan. The assumption is that the Minaret was attached to the Friday Mosque of Firuzkuh, which the Ghurid chronicler Juzjani states was washed away in a flash-flood, some time before the Mongol sieges. Work at Jam by the Minaret of Jam Archaeological Project, has found evidence of a large courtyard building beside the minaret, and evidence of river sediments on top of the baked-brick paving.
The Ghurid Empire’s glory waned after the death of Ghiyath ud-Din in 1202, as it was forced to cede territory to the Khwarezm Empire. Juzjani states that Firuzkuh was destroyed by the Mongols in 1222.

ytellioglu:

The Minaret of Jam is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in western Afghanistan. It is located in the Shahrak District, Ghor Province, by the Hari River. The 62-metre high minaret, surrounded by mountains that reach up to 2400m, was built in the 1190s, entirely of baked-bricks. It is famous for its intricate brick, stucco and glazed tile decoration, which consists of alternating bands of kufic and naskhi calligraphy, geometric patterns, and verses from the Qur’an


The Minaret of Jam is probably located at the site of the Ghurid Dynasty’s summer capital, Firuzkuh (Firuz Koh). During the 12th and 13th century, the Ghurids controlled what is now Afghanistan, but also parts of eastern Iran, Northern India and parts of Pakistan.

The Arabic inscription dating the minaret is unclear - it could read 1193/4 or 1174/5. It could thus commemorate the victory of the Ghurid sultan Ghiyas ud-Din over the Ghaznevids in 1186 in Lahore. However, Ralph Pinder-Wilson, believes the minaret was built for the victory of Mu’izz ad-Din, Ghiyath ud-Din’s brother, over Prithviraj Chauhan. The assumption is that the Minaret was attached to the Friday Mosque of Firuzkuh, which the Ghurid chronicler Juzjani states was washed away in a flash-flood, some time before the Mongol sieges. Work at Jam by the Minaret of Jam Archaeological Project, has found evidence of a large courtyard building beside the minaret, and evidence of river sediments on top of the baked-brick paving.

The Ghurid Empire’s glory waned after the death of Ghiyath ud-Din in 1202, as it was forced to cede territory to the Khwarezm Empire. Juzjani states that Firuzkuh was destroyed by the Mongols in 1222.

(via nomadsinmiddleages)

March 27, 2014

(Source: arronsingh, via walkingwiththespirits)

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