April 5, 2014

kingedwardviii:

royallymonroe:

A letter from Edward, Prince of Wales (Later Edward VIII) to his first mistress, Freda Dudley Ward. 

The two - who’s relationship lasted five years - met during an air raid in London, in 1918.

Buckhouse [Buckingham Palace] S.W. 

12th May 1919.

My darling beloved little Fredie,

Bless you for your two sweet little letters which have made me so so happy. Particularly the last one saying that you are arriving back this evening & suggesting that I shld [should] look in after the opera. Oh! No I couldn’t possibly do such a common thing as that - - - - !!!!

Sweetheart, how can you say “or shall we wait till Tues”? Of course must come & am so so overjoyed at the thought of seeing my own precious darling little girl again so soon. I ought to be able to get round about 12:00 & I’ll let myself in as I’ve still got the key!! It’s so so divine of you wanting your little David to come & you just can’t think how happy you’ve made him, beloved one & how much it makes him love & adore you.

[Writing across the top of the letter]

All all my great love & more [??] than I’m capable of sending my very own darling beloved precious little Fredie. Bless you!!

Your devoted and adoring petit(?) [??], David.

* I can’t make out the words marked with [??], can anyone else see what they are? Feel free to add them if you can.

This may be of particular interest to anyone who saw the Downton Abbey Christmas Special. 

The word marked above with the question marks is “baisers”, it´s french and means kisses.

(Source: TIME, via historicalwhatsits)

9:39pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zp1sgx1CBymfB
  
Filed under: history 
March 31, 2014
gunneratlarge:

Oh, and there was that time we burnt down that house.
No, I wasn’t joking.

WOW - now that is really  a sight, I hope you had some experimental archeologists working with you guys who took the chance to produce comparisons to finds and sifted through the ashes…

gunneratlarge:

Oh, and there was that time we burnt down that house.

No, I wasn’t joking.

WOW - now that is really  a sight, I hope you had some experimental archeologists working with you guys who took the chance to produce comparisons to finds and sifted through the ashes…

March 31, 2014
dailyreenactor:

IMG_0210.jpg on Flickr.

A very nice action shot which does exactly what living history and reenactment is all about - it gives the viewer the feeling to be right in the middle of history. Heads off to the photographer.

dailyreenactor:

IMG_0210.jpg on Flickr.

A very nice action shot which does exactly what living history and reenactment is all about - it gives the viewer the feeling to be right in the middle of history. Heads off to the photographer.

March 31, 2014
ritasv:

Photo by Pahz

pity that the horses equipment it modern, but a nice picture

ritasv:

Photo by Pahz

pity that the horses equipment it modern, but a nice picture

(Source: flickr.com)

March 31, 2014

bantarleton:

The British Legion in action!

March 31, 2014

Top:

Cancer image is folio 5v from the “Shaftesbury Psalter”, catalogued “Lansdowne 383” in the British Library.
http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=8825&CollID=15&NStart=383

Bottom:

Reproduction of it by Carlo Niato, painted on parchment with historic pigments and technique.

March 31, 2014

erikkwakkel:

chasing-yesterdays:

Medieval depictions of Cancer the Crab by artists who had possibly never actually seen a crab:

1) Detail from the floor of a twelve-legged owl-faced crab at Canterbury Catherdral, UK. Eerily reminiscent of the plastic “cootie” contained in the children’s game of the same name.

2) MSS, unsourced by author of original post, depicting a particularly disturbing crab with a human face and a furry tail. And a nosebleed.

3) Stone medallion above door-arch, Cathedrale St-Lazare, Burgundy, showing a crab that resembles an unholy love triangle between a pig, a duck, and a snapping turtle.

I love the approach in this (well-referenced) Tumblr: showing the same object depicted in different artistic media - floor decoration, book illumination and sculpting. It shows you how in the same age, the Middle Ages, artists had different ideas (and knowledge) about the objects they were depicting.


The 2nd image is folio 5v from the “Shaftesbury Psalter”, catalogued “Lansdowne 383” in the British Library.
http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/illuminatedmanuscripts/record.asp?MSID=8825&CollID=15&NStart=383

My boyfriend did a reproduction of it on parchment with historic pigments and technique, but I can´t upload it on this post, I will blog the reproduction in the next post.

(via blueandbluer)

March 27, 2014
ytellioglu:

The Minaret of Jam is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in western Afghanistan. It is located in the Shahrak District, Ghor Province, by the Hari River. The 62-metre high minaret, surrounded by mountains that reach up to 2400m, was built in the 1190s, entirely of baked-bricks. It is famous for its intricate brick, stucco and glazed tile decoration, which consists of alternating bands of kufic and naskhi calligraphy, geometric patterns, and verses from the Qur’an
 The Minaret of Jam is probably located at the site of the Ghurid Dynasty’s summer capital, Firuzkuh (Firuz Koh). During the 12th and 13th century, the Ghurids controlled what is now Afghanistan, but also parts of eastern Iran, Northern India and parts of Pakistan.
The Arabic inscription dating the minaret is unclear - it could read 1193/4 or 1174/5. It could thus commemorate the victory of the Ghurid sultan Ghiyas ud-Din over the Ghaznevids in 1186 in Lahore. However, Ralph Pinder-Wilson, believes the minaret was built for the victory of Mu’izz ad-Din, Ghiyath ud-Din’s brother, over Prithviraj Chauhan. The assumption is that the Minaret was attached to the Friday Mosque of Firuzkuh, which the Ghurid chronicler Juzjani states was washed away in a flash-flood, some time before the Mongol sieges. Work at Jam by the Minaret of Jam Archaeological Project, has found evidence of a large courtyard building beside the minaret, and evidence of river sediments on top of the baked-brick paving.
The Ghurid Empire’s glory waned after the death of Ghiyath ud-Din in 1202, as it was forced to cede territory to the Khwarezm Empire. Juzjani states that Firuzkuh was destroyed by the Mongols in 1222.

ytellioglu:

The Minaret of Jam is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in western Afghanistan. It is located in the Shahrak District, Ghor Province, by the Hari River. The 62-metre high minaret, surrounded by mountains that reach up to 2400m, was built in the 1190s, entirely of baked-bricks. It is famous for its intricate brick, stucco and glazed tile decoration, which consists of alternating bands of kufic and naskhi calligraphy, geometric patterns, and verses from the Qur’an


The Minaret of Jam is probably located at the site of the Ghurid Dynasty’s summer capital, Firuzkuh (Firuz Koh). During the 12th and 13th century, the Ghurids controlled what is now Afghanistan, but also parts of eastern Iran, Northern India and parts of Pakistan.

The Arabic inscription dating the minaret is unclear - it could read 1193/4 or 1174/5. It could thus commemorate the victory of the Ghurid sultan Ghiyas ud-Din over the Ghaznevids in 1186 in Lahore. However, Ralph Pinder-Wilson, believes the minaret was built for the victory of Mu’izz ad-Din, Ghiyath ud-Din’s brother, over Prithviraj Chauhan. The assumption is that the Minaret was attached to the Friday Mosque of Firuzkuh, which the Ghurid chronicler Juzjani states was washed away in a flash-flood, some time before the Mongol sieges. Work at Jam by the Minaret of Jam Archaeological Project, has found evidence of a large courtyard building beside the minaret, and evidence of river sediments on top of the baked-brick paving.

The Ghurid Empire’s glory waned after the death of Ghiyath ud-Din in 1202, as it was forced to cede territory to the Khwarezm Empire. Juzjani states that Firuzkuh was destroyed by the Mongols in 1222.

(via nomadsinmiddleages)

March 27, 2014

(Source: arronsingh, via dragons-breath-forge)

March 26, 2014
dailyreenactor:

crazyredcoat:

No comments.

I went to the last day of the school year in my reenacting kit every year I was in middle school and high school. Because I could.

That´s the spirit!

dailyreenactor:

crazyredcoat:

No comments.

I went to the last day of the school year in my reenacting kit every year I was in middle school and high school. Because I could.

That´s the spirit!

(Source: taocder)

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